USCRI Applauds New Protections for Ethiopians in the United States

By USCRI October 21, 2022

The U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants (USCRI) commends the announcement of a new designation of Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for Ethiopia. The TPS designation will provide needed protection for Ethiopians living in the United States, who will be able to remain in the country and receive work permits.

Ethiopia has been in the middle of a civil war since 2020, which has left more than 5.1 million people displaced. The country is also suffering from widespread food insecurity; the United Nations reported in August this year that one in three children under five are malnourished and 5.2 million people are facing starvation.

“It is heartening to see Ethiopians living in the United States get needed protection through this long overdue designation of TPS,” USCRI President and CEO Eskinder Negash said. “Our hearts go out to those affected by the violence in Ethiopia and we hope for a peaceful resolution to the conflict.”

USCRI also urges the Administration to immediately grant TPS to countries that fit the statutory requirements, including Mauritania, Guatemala, Honduras, and Mali. USCRI will continue to advocate for these designations and for the protection and well-being of those who are unable to return to their home countries.

USCRI, founded in 1911, is a non-governmental, not-for-profit international organization committed to working on behalf of refugees and immigrants and their transition to a dignified life.

For press inquiries, please contact: aplazasrocha@uscrimail.org


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